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powerful military, but the best education system? not so much. the survey compares thousands of reports from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as ot
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to action. we are a better country than this. the basic bargain at the heart of our economy has frayed. >> we are a better country than this. the president knows. because he's lived the american dream himself. >> i take this personally. i'm only here because this country educated my grandfather on the g.i. bill. my father left and my mom hit hard times trying to raise my sister and me while she was going to school, this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry. when michelle, the daughter of a shift worker at a water plant and a secretary, wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it. until we could pay it back. so it drives me as a grandson, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working, optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the same, the same incredible chance that t
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
education. tell me about what you're doing. >> just like we're fighting income equality, we have to fight education inequality. and that means the places that have gotten hurt the most by austerity, by privatization, by attesting fixation. they have come together. parents, community-based organizations particularly in low income neighborhoods with our union to say we need a new direction. we need to reclaim the promise of public education with our solutions for our schools. we need to fix, not close public schools. we need to actually have a fixation on children, not on testing. we need wrap around services to actually mitigate poverty. pre-k, different pathways to graduation. what's happening is it's not just our union talking about it. it's in 60 cities over a hundred groups coming together to say let's together have this new direction to help all of our kids succeed. >> we'll be watching it monday. >> thank you. >> jared bernstein, randi weingarten, thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> coming up, the right wing hypocrisy on nelson mandela is at epic level. a
cahealth care a education, we're still in it but it's just changed phases. >> one of the things that has to change, and one of the things professor ogletree said about him being a patriot, it is a much different world then than it is now. the great cold war was on at that time and the south african government was aligned with the united states. and people who were seeing that struggle were seeing the south african government as an ally of the united states and not paying enough attention to the big human rights issues. but the big issue going forward now is president zuma in south africa now and does he get the lessons from the life and leadership of president mandela and other leaders in africa, and not just that continent but around the world that they can take something away from that. there are not going to be a lot of people dancing in the streets because they're mourning the loss of mugabwe, for example, next door, but i hope the lesson this week and the days to come, that people will see the real value of the kind of leadership that was not self-centered and it was not based on di
. a low-cast accredited university that was named one of the most disruptive in education. "squawk" will be right back. [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease the 2014 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. a confident retirement. those dreams, there's just no way we're going to let them die. ♪ like they helped millions of others. by listening. planning. working one on one. that's what ameriprise financial does. that's what they can do with you. that's how ameriprise puts more within reach. ♪ >>> looks like yesterday's trading sort of. nothing happening. but you never know. and coming up, our higher learning series continues today with two men disrupting the world of online education. the ceo of university now and the president of ed x joins us after the break. i love having a free checked bag with my unit
personal adversity and committed to philanthropy and higher education. you know who else got one this year? class of 2014, coty at honey well and jerry jones, owner of the cowboys. they're in great company with you. congratulations. that's a real honor. it's a big deal for the class of 2014. >> well, thank you for saying that joe. it is an honor. i admire the ratio society greatly. they take individuals andle challenge circumstances and give them an opportunity through scholarships to change their life through education. and to join companies not only those you mentioned but most importantly our previous winner our founder. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime. >> you didn't get it yet, did you? when do they do it? >> no. the event is in april in washington d.c. >> it's a big deal. >> it's quite something. i look forward to hit. >> can congratulations. we'll check back with you on. that think about it if you see the tape. i look good in that suit. >> actually joe, when i see the ron burgundy commercial, i do think of you. i don't know why. >> i think that's a compliment? thanks m
was in some ways accidentally privileged by being able to get a missionary education, and he started out life essentially with a tremendous sense of self-confidence inspired by his local community. and to take him from that position which makes him an aspiring lawyer, by his early 30s he's already rising the ranks of the anc only marks the ways in which he evolved as an individual. and i think we have to hold that in place because he lived so long that he was able to draw on so many strains of thought. so, yes, he went through a period where he embraced africanism or black nationalism to a point where the notion of race first many the tradition of a marcus garvey in the united states, for example, this notion that black people have to solidify. and yes, the anc, there was tension there. >> such a great point, he lives to be nearly 100 years old. his trajectory for change is very different from that of a king who was assassinated while still a young man. one quick question then more after the break. not only do we misremember mandela, we misremember ourselves in relationship to mandela. we now
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. . >>> one prominent political so, with chevy's black friday sale, the price you see is the price you pay? yep, best prices of the year. i can't see. honey. [ laughs ] brad. yeah? what are you doing? uh... hi. hi. [ male announcer ] it's the chevy black friday sale. during the chevy black friday sale, get this malibu ls for under $20,000 or this cruze ls for around $17,000. hurry. the best prices of the year end monday, december 2nd. >>> no meet the press" is back with our political roundtable. chuck todd, stephanie rawlings-blake, andrea mitchell. >> welcome, stephanie rawlings-blake, mayor of baltimore, first time on "meet the press." mayor since 2010, serves on the national democratic committee as well. nice to have you here. >> nice to be here. >> the question is how good are things, really, and chu
deep, deep, deep cuts in education and unemployment benefits and health insurance for the poor. they've even gone after preschool in the state, all policies that will pretty directly hit the shoppers at the pope family stores, right? bargain town, bill's dollar store, the super 10 the super dollar, treasure mart, roses, maxway, all of the dollar stores that are part of their empire, all of the discount dollar stores that have made art pope and his family all of their many millions, which they have now spent to go after the poor in north carolina in a way that nobody has in more than 100 years. today, the state's naacp held a news conference outside the state budget office, outside art pope's office, announcing a campaign targeting mr. pope's discount stores. they're calling it a picketing campaign to educate dollar store customers about what they called the extreme and aggressive policies that they are funding by shopping at stores owned by mr. pope. >> we want to put a stop to the use of wealth to influence policies in a negative way. that's why it's not a boycott, it's a picket. >>
and education, we're still in it but it's just changed phases. >> one of the things that has to be learned, and one of the things professor ogletree said about him being a patriot, it is a much different world then than it is now. the great cold war was on at that time and the south african government was aligned with the united states. and people who were seeing that struggle were seeing the south african government as an ally of the united states and not paying enough attention to the big human rights issues. but the big issue going forward now is president zuma in south africa and does he get the lessons from the life and leadership of president mandela and other leaders in africa, and not just that continent but around the world that they can take something away from that. there are not going to be a lot of people dancing in the streets because they're mourning the loss of mugabwe, for example, next door, but i hope the lesson this week and the days to come, that people will see the real value of the kind of leadership that was not self-centered and it was not based on division but on
. the number of black children who get educate in the integrated schools is something like 10%. you look at the leadership zuma versus mandela. and it doesn't seem as if this were and upward trend. >> that's true and that discrepancy is true. but it's also true that the standard of living of black south africans has risen considerably since 1993, that the number of black south africans with electricity and clean drinking water and in the education system, all of it's gone up. south africa when you look at it from the outside, a glass half empty, glass half empty viewpoint. but i think what's really going to be interesting goi ing forwa is in a sense a kind of custody battle for brand mandela who claims them as their real symbol. and for mandela, symbolism was his stuff in trade. he realized that he was this astonishingly powerful symbol. a and across the world, we all want to claim him. all other countries want to claim mandela he represents our better selves in that sense. but within south africa, the question is he now a national symbol or to what extent the anc keeps him as their symb
for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here in new york with you today. news after an admission by the engineer at the controls of the speeding train tha
paying? >> well, a job that's better paying calls for a higher education. and, you know, if you don't have that, then it's hard to get a better paying job. and, you know, a lot of people cannot get a better education because of them having to work and take care of a home. >> and, mary, i understand you're also taking care of a daughter with a heart condition, two grandchildren. how old are you, if you don't mind me asking? >> i'm 59 years old. >> and, mary, i imagine then trying to move up in this position, as you say, without the access to education that could enable you to get another job is a huge problem potentially. when you began working all of those years ago, did you have a different outcome in mind? >> yes, i did. i never thought it would get worse. i've always felt that it would get better instead of worse. but it has made a turnaround. >> i want to also, mary, just give you -- let you listen to an interview we had yesterday with jamie richardson. he's a white castle vice president. we said to him, jamie, what would happen if the minimum wage were raised to $15 an hour for
do not have the same access to material educational resources, et cetera, et cetera. right? that it's not sort of this evil, bad guy, individual villain situation going on. and, unfortunately, i think because, as you said, also, we have not actually had a lot of practice at having these kinds of discussions about, sort of, how systems work, to oppress large groups of people, while at the same time, they work to privilege other large groups of people that, you know, the first response that many of us have is one of defense, defensiveness. so, you know, sometimes that's what happens in the classroom, unfortunately. because i -- >> i was going to say, professor gibney. absolutely, right? sometimes, particularly when we're trying to foster conversations that young people are not used to having, on any of a variety of topics, but race can be one of the key ones, defensiveness is one part of it, which is part of why it always falls on us to do the work of trying to make these classrooms sites of democratic deliberations that are useful. so when you have had success, when you have had stud
of the dynamics here, why this is happening? are hospitals doing their part to help to educate people as far as what's going on with this? >> they are. they are working hard to let people know what the dynamic is. part of the debate has to be not just about hospitals and governors but the business communities in these places saying if we're going to be competitive, if we're doing to have a strong educated workforce that can go to work in the morning and be health y, we have to make sure we support essential hospitals in every way we can. that business community has got to step up to the plate in these states. >> doctor, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >>> coming up new details in yesterday's early morning train wreck that left four dead. we'll have an update after the break. if i can impart one lesson to a new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line community, that helps our members connect and share ideas to make smart business decisions. if you mess up, fess up. be your partners best partner
. i'm just trying to safe you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to educate you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. leave it to twitter to produce the ultimate question that is defining this stock market. including today where the dow sank 78 points. s&p back 7.2%. at jim query, would you buy amazon here? my quick response, two very different questions, yes and no. that's right. yes, i would buy amazon. no, it's not worth $400. welcome to the world of bull market discipline. the discipline to buy stocks that aren't cheap but are right. a discipline that will be tested in the next few days. at last because of today's last hour 7 sell-off -- >> sell, sell, sell! >> that shook people out of their complacency. i'm talking about the rigger to recognize what the market actually wants, though, not necessarily what you want. the dichotomy says you would rather have a portfolio that is hated and making money than be bound by concerns that may not be as relevant as they should be. let's start with amazon, which hit at an all-time high today, $399 before being repelled along wit
there who's not my kid has a chance at a good education or that guy over there who i'm not related to has a chance at a decent job and a decent retirement, i'm going to be better off. i'm going to be living in a society that is more cohesive and is going to create the kind of future for our kids that were all want. and that more than anything is at the core of the debate that i've been having with the republican party over the last several years. it's not just the details of the affordable care act or, you know, the minimum wage. because as i said yesterday in the speech, if you've got better ideas for achieving the same goal, put them out there. i'm not wedded to one particular way of doing things. but the central argument i have is we do have an obligation to each other. and there's some things we can do together. in fact, the big challenges we have whether it's immigration, climate change, an economy that works for everybody, improving our education system, making college more affordable, competing in the world economy, dealing with questions of war and peace, those are not things that
a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. is caused by people looking fore traffic parking.y that's remarkable that so much energy is, is wasted. streetline has looked at the problem of parking, which has not been looked at for the last 30, 40 years, we wanted to rethink that whole industry, so we go and put out these sensors in each parking spot and then there's a mesh network that takes this information sends it over the internet so you can go find exactly where those open parking spots are. the collaboration with citi was important for providing us the necessary financing; allow this small start-up to go provide a service to municipalities. citi has been an incredible source of advice, how to engage with municipalities, how to structure deals, and as we think about internationally, citi is there every step of the way. so the end result is you reduce congestion, you reduce pollution and you provide a service to merchants
now. >>> when it comes to our educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. the woman who turned around the dc school system knows how to fix it. michelle ree is up next. >>> martin bashir resigns after making disgusting comments about sarah palin. she's here to respond for the first time on tv. you'll see it only on "fox & friends" in about a half hour >>> the answer to the aflac trivia question, frankie muniz. the winner is jill from georgia. she'll get a copy of "george washington's secret six" which i will sign and we will send. >>> when it comes to educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. >> just take a look at the latest test results. we have american students, they didn't make the top five for reading, in fact, they fell to 17th overall. >> when it comes to science, we came in 21st. >> the worst of all, math, where american students ranked 26. >> right. so why do our students keep ahe? michelle ree is the founder of students first and former chancellor of dc's public schools. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> certainly
about where america stands when it comes to the rest of the world in terms of educational skills. we have a lot of work to be done. so these are decimal points we're talking about. it's not really dealing with the larger, big picture issue about the american economy. >> katty kay, a final point on this? the president talked about a higher wage hike this week, and it's just not going to happen. it's not going to happen if you look at the current political climate. so a lot of these things still go unaddressed. >> he was out making a political pitch this week, but you have individual states, individual cities that are doing things on the minimum wage, but we have the prospect of unemployment benefits being rescinded the beginning of next year. that could again have another knock on effect of growth if people are not getting that kind of money. the underlying issues of this economy are still fragile at the moment, and the political consensus in washington to really shore things up, to do the things that are necessary, is not there. >> we're going to leave it there for today. thank you a
for one-to-one support and education. peoi go to angie's listt for all kinds of reasons. to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. >>> ♪ >> that is just the first serving. a supersize fight for a supersize wage that will be going on all week, into next week fast-food workers backed by union groups, walking off the job, turning off the volume. david lee miller is in lower manhattan. >> reporter: not clear is precisely how many fast food workers today actually walked off of the job. we are in lower manhattan right now in a rally is expected to get underway wind the next half hour. a number of rallies throughout the day and throu
and educational equity that might provide us equal footing. so in that case, it's much ado about nothing. it's a lot of talk. as james brown said, you're talking loud and saying nothing. >> zerlina, how aggressive should the white house be on the heels of this website, massingive provement meeting the date? >> very aggressive. as a person uninsured and has been on the new york exchange, i think that people that are uninsured have a great deal of patience. and the white house should exploit that patience. because people that are uninsured want health insurance. and that's why the traffic is so high. i think they need to be very aggressive here and say the website is getting better and better and people are going to fundamentally -- their lives are going to change. >> time for the offense. no doubt about it. michael eric dyson, sgher lena maxwell, thanks for being on "the ed show." appreciate it. >>> coming up, a north dakota local news station keeps it classy. how are things with the new guy? all we do is go out to dinner. that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...wh to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. cortizone-10 has the strongest nonprescription itch medicine plus moisturizers to help heal skin fast. cortizone-10. feel the heal. president obama goes on the offensive today to try to revive his signature health care reform law. the obama team spent weeks playing defense over the disastrous debut of the website. next hour he kicks off a new campaign to highlight the benefits of the affordable care act. the administration plans daily events through december 23rd but convincing young people to sign up for obama care may be a tough sell. according to a brand-new gallup poll, americans aged 18 to 29 are the least familiar with the health care law. this is the main group, by the way, an the administration needs toe attract to make the whole system work. call it crisis management on a global scale. vice president biden is on a mission to ease tensions between china and japan. he and the new u.s. ambassador to japan, caroline kennedy sat down with japan's deputy prime minister taro as
want to make you money. my job is not just to educate you, but entertain you so call me at 800-743-cnbc. with the dow seek 95 points and the s&p dropping and at one point the selling was far worse and it looked like we could be in the midst of a major rollover. still today like yesterday, the buyers and sellers did real soul-searching, and what exactly are they pondering? basically, they're trying to figure out if good news about the economy is bad news for stocks or is the opposite the case, as the economy improves should we like stocks more? it's a first-class quandary that we have to dive into headlong on "mad money" if we're going to figure out the market's move. it's distracted and a parlor game and we find you the best stocks and the best opportunities. the only focus on the fed's next move the last three years, you missed some of the single best moments to invest in our lifetimes. i regard that as terrible. i regard it as shameful because this fed-centric world presumes that the market is one big stock that is sent higher or lower by ben bernanke and janet yellin and it's the mar
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. it's donut friday at the office. aso every friday morning they psend me out to get the goods. but what they don't know is that i'm using my citi thankyou card at the coffee shop, so i get 2 times the points. and those points add up fast. so, sure, make me the grunt. 'cause i'll be using those points to help me get to a beach in miami. and allllllll the big shots will be stuck here at the cube farm. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual apply, go to >>> i'm milissa rehberger. a union official says the engineer of a train that derailed in new york caught himself nodding off just before a sharp curve. >>> a federal judge says detroit can declare bankruptcy. it allows detroit to cut employee pensions. lawmakers in illinois passed a bill overhauling the state's pension system which is $100 billion in debt. the measure in part cuts benefits to workers and retirees. back to "hardball." ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." after the republi
you because your books and your show have been an absolutely priceless financial education. >> you're terrific. thank you so much. i think you'll like the new book coming out in a few weeks. >> caller: from your book "getting back to even" i'm doing the stock replacement strategy. >> it's complicated. but that's great. >> caller: i have not shorted the common yet which i should have done last week, i had great ga gains and i lost a lot of the gains this week. when should i short disney? >> i don't want you. we'll get a deeper month out. the strategy is complicated in getting back to even. disney is a buy, not a sell. i don't want you fooling around with it. when it does spike 1.5 to $2 it will flatten out. but you're fine right now. steve in california. >> caller: hello there, jim. >> hey, steve. >> caller: thank you to all the home gamers from all the home gamers for making this holiday season a prosperous one. >> yes. i want everyone to do well. that's my game plan. >> caller: i appreciate you help us make money. i love the fact you give it away in a charitable trust. >> thank yo
to educate both young men and young women regarding drinking on campus, the perils that come. and this is not to blame any victim. let me be clear on that. but it is the conversation that's ongoing on college campuses and everywhere regarding safety and some of the things that played out according to this warrant here. >> it's interesting you bring that up because earlier this week a piece went viral written by a woman named roxanne jones. she's one of the founding editors of "espn" the magazine. the whole gist of her story was to say to her college son, before you have sex on a college campus, you should get a yes via text to alleviate any controversy as to these sort of he said, she said situations where there's alcohol involved. i don't know if i'm going to go that far and tell my kids get a yes via text, but if foreplay is by text these days, it's not too far removed, is it? >> it's a legitimate conversation to have, especially given we've done these types of stories too often. and to your point, dave, in many cases, this turns out to be true, someone is charged and hopef
. my job is not just to entertain but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. battle stations! that's where we are on the eve of the hugely important labor department nonfarm payroll report that comes out tomorrow morning at 8:30 a.m. the stock market is telling us to be ready. we had our fifth straight decline today. dow seeking 68 points, nasdaq declining .12%. we know that's because there's been too much good data lately. it should be that, no, good data. because we are in a good news is bad news environment. this is good news moves interest rates higher. whether the fed likes it or not! remember, the fed wants rates down as more jobs can be created. but at a certain point, you have to ask, aren't more jobs being created? the fed stops trying to keep interest rates down or stops being able to. it's a fore gone conclusion the whole stock market will decline regardless of what the fed says or does. that's been the case before even as the last late run-up going to be the case again. i'm not debating that. there are tons of reasons why stocks could. we know risk-free bonds that
to make you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. what a day. what a day this was! we got an employment number that had something for everyone. and it catapulted the averages higher. dow gaining 199 points. s&p falling 1.12% and the nasdaq climbing. stocks had been going down. for five days and the expectation that interest rates had to rise, because there would be such a huge burst of hiring. investors had been selling down their holding, they thought growth was too robust. instead we got a cinderella payroll employment number this morning that gave people a reason to stop selling bonds and to start -- >> buy, buy, buy! >> -- stocks, which had been dropping all week. it's a pretty amazing thing to watch. the same stocks that have been hammered going into the jobs report spring back to life. the banks, industrials, housing-related names, the consumer product stocks. almost as if they were all priced to a huge bond selloff which would've driven rates up, and when they didn't happen, we put the labor report under the cate
a sense of an education. you have a sense of, "oh my goodness. i've known washington has been something i've been disappointed in. but i didn't know it looked like this. i didn't know it had come to all of this just this -- incredible contempt for what they are supposed to be there for." contempt for what their constituents are, i.e., us. >> you say political washington is "an inbred company town where party differences are easily subsumed by membership in the club." and you talked about the club. "the club swells for the night into the ultimate bubble world. they become part of a system that rewards, more than anything a system of self-perpetuation." >> self-perpetuation is a key point in all of this. it is what you're going to -- how you're going to continue. i mean, the original notion of the founders is that a president or a public servant would serve a term, couple years, return to their communities, return to their farm. now the organizing principle of life in washington is how are you going to keep it going? whether it's how you're going to stay in office, you know, by pleasing yo
educated. >> i'm not the biggest quoter of gallup but the over well ing majority of americans want it repealed or major changes. whien won't the president say, you know what, i made promises we can't keep. why don't we cut our losses and debate this to get a system you would buy into. >> you know what, i think the president made it clear he has always wanted further debate and input. setting the aside, i feel that way. there's never been a major law passed that didn't need to be revised and amended. >> david. >> every one. >> h says we are not going back on this no matter how many people it hurt. >> he said, not while i'm president. >> he couldn't be more clear. >> it doesn't matter what he said. look what he does. >> at least you came off of that. >> he did say we are not going back. he doesn't intend to go back. he intended to hurt people because he knew -- >> for what reason? >> to advance statism and redistribution. i'm serious. >> which people -- >> there was collateral damage. he hurt them because he was hell bent on socialized medicine. i believe that. >> really? i don't thi
months ago a friend suggested he see a professor of reading education here at oklahoma northeastern state university. >> he told me i was wasting my time. and i said, we'll just sit and chat a couple of times a week is that okay? >> toby says eventually their weekly talks gave way to flashcards. >> everything started clicking. he got pretty good at the sight words. but the real break through came in february when at the age of 89, ed grey read this book about george washington. >> it gave me goose bumps it still does. it still does. he read three more that week. though they were all just third grade level biographies each one had the same dramatic ending. >> did you ever think you'd read that? >> this has changed my whole life. i'm not the same guy i was when i started with toby i'm a different man now. >> today, ed is at a 6th grade level now can enjoy benefits literacy provides. most notably -- karaoke. ♪ we asked him to sing for us on this night but he does it all the time on his own. reading really has given him tremendous confidence which he hopes will inspire others. >> get in the
people across the country will be thinking of our children and educators. so tragically taken from us. and wondering how to help. we ask that you consider performing an can the an of kindness or volunteering with a charitable organization in your own local community. we hope that some small pressure of good may be returned to the world. this concludes our family statement. i'd like to add that our family will be lighting a candle on the eve of 12/14, the last night we spent with our sweet charlotte. >> and we will be lighting a candle for our beautiful little girl jessica. >> we will be lighting a candle on behalf jessie mccord louis. >> we're going to light a candle in honor of our daughter emily. >> we will light a candle for my mom dawn. >> we will light a candle for my older sister, victoria. >> we will be lighting a candle for my sweet boy jack. >> we will be lighting a candle in honor of our beautiful girl grace. >> we will be lighting a candle for our gorgeous daughter avile. >> we'll be lighting a candle for our beautiful daughter anna [ speaking foreign language ] >> we will
to cramerica. my job is not just to educate but also to teach you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. to most private investors, the bad news is good news for stock story doesn't pass the smell test. saw that tweet this morning at 4:30 on the day where the dow gained 30 points and nasdaq advanced .15%. and it's always been like this. and the tweeter came back, so investing in stocks is bedding on the fed? is that why small investors always get in at the top? in other words, this guy just doesn't think the move is right. i think that the word right has to be the most expensive word in the english language. this is not an ethics class, people. it's not an exercise in some bizarre form of justice. it's not right or wrong! what seems obvious to me and incomprehensible to others. i sound like someone who wants to get away with something, while those who think it's not right somehow represent the true path of reason. how the heck did this happen? how could so many people feel like @paulkingsley? i think it's central to finding out the next leg of this market. it holds the key if stocks can rally hi
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. kand i don't have time foris morunreliable companies.b angie's list definitely saves me time and money. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. it fills you with energy... and it gives you what you are looking for to live a more natural life. in a convenient two bar pack. this is nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >>> nervous democrats worried about 2014 may be breathing just a little easier now that the obama care website is working a lot better. of course democrats have been antsy after two months of negative headlines. and although the site does look better for the consumer logging on, just this morning nbc news learned that a senior representative with america's health insurance plans says there are still significant issues with the back end of operations. so on its website this is what it says. until the enrollment process is working from end to end, many consumers will not be able to enroll in coverage. in addition to fixing the technical p
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> hey, you know, we want to welcome brian stetler to cnn. he is the new host of "reliable sourc sources." >> every sunday. brian, good to have you. welcome to cnn. >> thank you. great to be here. >> so each week you're going to talk about the top stories and media's approach to those stories. for your first ever "reliable sources," you're looking at the one year anniversary of the events in newtown, sandy hook. >> that's right. we are looking both back a wum days at the 911 tapes that were released this week were excruciating to hear and then looking forward to the anniversary and wondering if news organizations are going to come into newtown and use the town as backdrop for the coverage of the anniversary. cnn says they're not going to come to the down that day. they don't want to disrupt the families that are there. but it's an interesting media ethics ish u that we're going to talk to a reporter who actually lives in newtown. >> everybody remembers where they were, you know, when they heard about what is happening. you jus
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. when you do what i do, iyou think about risk.. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >> up next steve rattner will be here and former governor ed rendell joins the conversation. "morning joe" is
for their grandkids' educations... they chose a partner to help manage their wealth... one whose insights, solutions, and approach have been relied on for over 200 years. that's the value of trusted connections. that's u.s. trust. >>> if company insiders are selling shares as stock prices rise, question is, should individual investors do the same thing? >> sheila tracking who's selling what and tracking a pattern. what are you finding? >> let's start off with the numbers. there's definitely big numbers in november. in fact, $7.4 billion of insider stock was sold by companies. now, yes, you can say this is a trend that happens whenever markets pick up steam or at the end of the year for tax planning purposes. keep in mind, this is an 85% increase from the numbers we saw in october and the highest levels we have seen since may. definitely, a lot of selling happening. here is some big names we saw the most inside selling over the past three months. best buy, $200 million worth of shares sold by insiders over the past three months. amazon saw $400 million worth of shares, including jeff bezos selling a
investments and infrastructure and education, so this gives him a little fuel to do that as the rollout to obama care has been so rocky. this is certainly something the white house is welcoming here. >> we'll check back. brianna keilar live at the white house this morning. >>> and now let's head back to washington and bring in wolf blitzer for more on our special coverage of the passing of nelson mandela. wolf, take it away. >> to the world, nelson mandela was a freedom fighting revolutionary who later rose to be a statesman and influenced others as aan icon and ambassador of peace. in his native south africa he was lovingly known as madiba, a symbol his countrymen had for their president. jacob zuma yesterday spoke about his legacy. >> we'll always love madiba for teaching us that it is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. >> president zuma also announced funeral plans for nelson mandela, including a national day of prayer and reflection this sunday, an open air memorial service at johannesburg soccer stadium next tuesday and his buria
. in november, many were good-paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care, 27,000 manufacturing jobs added. 17,000 construction jobs. >> now we're getting consistent job reports that are plus 200,000. that's very positive not only for the economy but it should be positive for people should start to feel generally better. that conditions are in fact improving. >> on closer look, the unemployment rate for adult men is at 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but the numbers are higher for african-americans and teenagers. still, some worry washington's upcoming budget battles could threaten the recovery. >> it's quite clear that the u.s. economy pays attention to what washington is doing. but this is an unpredictable business. makes it interesting, but it makes it hard to know sort of what the washington does in the next week, month, or year. what that means for sort of how much the economy can recover and at what rate. >> while there might be political uncertainty, for the time being, there is only good news for those like recent college grad eddie christian who just landed his first job. >> i look at this
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for join iing me. >>> investigators are trying to figure out why a train that derailed sunday killing four people was going 82 miles an hour, nearly three times the speed limit it should have been going around a curve. train's engineer is being questioned for a second day as investigators try to pinpoint why that train was going so fast. >>> health officials say there is little chance that passengers on a us airways flight might come down with tuberculosis after a scare in the air. a passenger was removed from the plane on a flight from austin to phoenix. >> the flight attendant approached us. she had a mask in her hands that you cover your nose with. she approached the man. he was about mid cabin, i would say, to my left. a window seat, a very slight -- slightly built man and told him to put the mask on. >> cdc says it's still waiting for test results to confirm if, indeed, that passenger really has tb. this morning, we have new video to show you t
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